Do Get It Twisted

I mentioned earlier that one of the things that drew me to Stephen West’s designs is his out of the box thinking when it comes to construction methods. He takes something classic, like cables, and twists it just a little.

Clue #2 was released last weekend and the cable style is something I have honestly never seen before. I should have photos to share next time, but today I’d like to share some information about the basics of the stitch.

Habitat
Habitat, designed by Jared Flood

I made this hat a few years ago and it remains one of my favorite projects. The cables are very traditional, with two and four-rib braids.

A cable is created by knitting stitches out of order. One of the most important things to note (and where Stephen just threw the rules out of the window in the MKAL pattern) – the twists and crossovers are in stockinette, meaning that the front side is knit and the back (wrong side) is purled; the areas surrounding the stitches are reverse stockinette, meaning the front is purled and the back is knit. This ensures that the cables are a bit raised from the fabric and stand out a bit.

Theresa Vinson Stenersen at Knitty has a wonderful photo tutorial on cable basics, for both front and back cross styles.

For those of you, like me, who learn better with video, this one is detailed and clear.

Cabling without a needle is a technique that still scares me but Ysolda Teague makes it seem almost doable. I think it’s a great trick to have for smaller cables! Her Techinique Thursday series of posts are ones I keep bookmarked – we’ll come back to a few more, I’m sure.

One final trick is from Knitting Daily and I know it will come in handy for the MKAL pattern. Steven included a lot of plain rows between the cables, so knowing how to easily keep track will be a huge help.

If you’d like to explore examples of more cable stitches, I’ve collected some over on Pinterest!

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